Deadlift

Is a hex bar deadlift easier? The Benefits and Drawbacks of Hex Bar Deadlifts

The deadlift is the ultimate test of strength for the entire body. While the regular Olympic bar is still the most common way to perform deadlifts, more men are opting for the hex bar, which is a hexagon-shaped bar that you stand in the middle of. Because many bodybuilders use it to shrug, it’s commonly referred to as a “trap bar.”

Is a hex bar deadlift easier
Is a hex bar deadlift easier

Although the normal deadlift with an Olympic barbell is the most frequent and the method utilised in deadlift contests, many men feel that deadlifting with a hex bar is less taxing on the back and more comfortable overall.

The hex bar deadlift is a strength training exercise that can be used by both novice and professional lifters. Is a hex bar deadlift easier?

What Is a Deadlift with a Hex Bar?

What Is a Deadlift with a Hex Bar?

The hex bar deadlift, also known as the trap bar deadlift, is a deadlift variation that employs a hexagon-shaped speciality barbell that allows the lifter to step within and lift the weight around them. Hex bars have two sets of handles, one at standard height and one slightly higher for easier lifting; this makes hex bar deadlifts an excellent alternative for novices.

What’s the Difference Between a Hex Bar Deadlift and a Deadlift?

What’s the Difference Between a Hex Bar Deadlift and a Deadlift?

Many of the same muscle groups are worked by the hex bar deadlift as they are by the traditional deadlift. There are, however, a few distinctions between them.

  • Hex bar deadlifts may feel easier for certain lifters because the weight is kept closer to your centre of gravity throughout the exercise. Hex bar deadlifts, when done correctly, put less stress on your lower back and biceps than traditional deadlifts.
  • When compared to the traditional deadlift, the hex bar deadlift delivers more knee flexion, which means your knees bend slightly more when completing the hex bar deadlift. This knee flexion necessitates a more upright torso, making the hex bar deadlift similar to a squat workout.
  • Hex bar deadlifts work your quadriceps, whereas traditional barbell deadlifts focus on muscular groups in your lower back and backs of your legs (such as the hamstrings and erector spinae muscles).

How to Deadlift with a Hex Bar

How to Deadlift with a Hex Bar

Begin with a weight that you can control for 2–3 sets of 3–8 repetitions on the hex bar deadlift. Choose a weight that allows you to maintain proper technique throughout all sets and repetitions

  1. Begin by standing in the middle of the hex bar. With your feet shoulder- to hip-width apart and a modest bend in your knees, your posture should be tall. Your shoulders should be directly above your hips, and your head and neck should be in a neutral position.
  2. Throughout the action, keep your chin tucked, as if you were cradling an egg beneath your chin. Your weight should be evenly distributed across your entire foot. To create a stable foot position, grab the floor with your feet. With a slight bend in your elbows, keep your arms long at your sides.
  3. Before lowering towards the hex bar handles, tighten your shoulders, hips, and core with a good inhale and exhale.
  4. Lower your body towards the hex bar by hingeing your hips and bending your knees.
    Grab the hex bar handles and rotate your arms so the inner elbow is pointing front to stimulate your back muscles.
  5. Raise your hips up and back until the backs of your legs are stretched. Your hips and shoulders should be higher than your knees and hips higher than shoulders. The position of your shins should be upright. This is where you should start all repeats.
  6. Keep the hex bar centred while maintaining a neutral spine, then begin your upward movement by pressing your feet through the floor. Squeeze your glutes and allow your hips to move forwards as you stand. Consider your pelvis to be a bucket filled with water that you’re trying to keep from spilling out the front, back, or sides.
  7. Keep your arms long as your hips go forwards, and finish the movement by squeezing your glutes while maintaining a neutral spine. Your shoulders should finish squarely over your hips at the end of each repetition.
  8. Begin down the stairs. Focus on keeping the hex bar centred and maintaining a neutral spine as you lower to the starting position. Allowing your knees to bend, hinge from your hips to lower the hex bar back to the floor.
  9. The repetition is finished when the weight plates reach the floor. (If the hex bar does not contain weight plates, lower it until your hands reach your mid-shin.)

How to Exercise in a Safe and Injured-Free Manner

How to Exercise in a Safe and Injured-Free Manner

Consult your doctor before starting an exercise programme if you have a past or pre-existing health issue. Proper exercise technique is critical for ensuring the safety and success of an exercise programme, but depending on your specific demands, you may need to alter each exercise to achieve the best results.

Always choose a weight that permits you to maintain complete body control throughout the exercise. Pay great attention to your body when doing any exercise, and stop immediately if you feel any pain or discomfort.

Incorporate correct warm-ups, rest, and nutrition into your training regimen to see continuous growth and build body strength. Your capacity to adequately recuperate from your workouts will ultimately determine your results. Allow for adequate recovery by resting for 24 to 48 hours before training the same muscle groups.

Is a hex bar deadlift easier: Review

Is a hex bar deadlift easier: Review

It is essentially easier for the majority of people. You can lift more weight, don’t have to worry as much about leg drive technique, and the grip is easier because the bar isn’t rolling or rubbing against your thighs. Many people, even those who are professionals on a straight barbell, can lift a good 20+kg more on an equally long distance pull on the hex bar.

Another thing to constantly keep in mind is that most hex bars and trap bar have handles that sit higher than the structure – reducing the bar path dramatically, atleast a good 10-12cm. When comparing this type of trap bar pull against a raised straight bar, you’ll always find that the trap bar has the best leverage.

Fun fact: Some people can pull 320-360 pounds on a high-handled hex bar while only lifting 230 pounds on a straight bar.

Hex bar or barbell deadlifts: which is better?

Hex bar or barbell deadlifts: which is better?

The deadlift is the ultimate test of strength for the entire body. While the standard Olympic bar is still the most common way to perform deadlifts, more men are opting for the hex bar, which is a hexagon-shaped bar that you stand in the middle of. Because many bodybuilders use it to shrug, it’s commonly referred to as a “trap bar.”

When competitive powerlifters executed deadlifts with an Olympic bar and a hex bar, researchers in the United Kingdom compared their strength and biomechanics. They found that when test subjects deadlifted with a hex bar, they were able to lift about 50 pounds more than when they deadlifted using a barbell, according to a study published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The hex bar deadlift also put less stress on the lower back, according to the UK researchers.

If your gym has a hex bar, consider using it for some deadlifts instead of only shrugs. It allows you to lift more weight than regular deadlifts (which puts more strain on the leg muscles), resulting in longer-term muscle building. Even if you compete in deadlifting, using the hex bar on occasion will help you lift more weight and strengthen your lower-body muscles. If you’ve had to give up deadlifts owing to lower-back pain, the hex bar could be the key to getting you back into them.

The Benefits and Drawbacks of Hex Bar Deadlifts

The Benefits and Drawbacks of Hex Bar Deadlifts

Pros:

  • As you drop the weight, don’t smash your shins on the barbell!
  • The trap bars’ neutral grip makes the workout more comfortable for your shoulders, elbows, and wrists.
  • The workout focuses more on the quads, resulting in improved leg power development.
  • They’re simple and safe for beginners who are new to deadlifting.

Cons:

  • For shorter trainees, they can be difficult. Because the handles are a fixed width, folks with shorter arms may find the grip excessively wide.
  • There is less emphasis on the posterior chain. The quadriceps get more attention than the glutes, hamstrings, and lower back. You’ll need to add more posterior-chain-focused modifications to your routine (like the standard barbell deadlift).

Is deadlifting with a hex bar easier than deadlifting with a straight bar?

Is deadlifting with a hex bar easier than deadlifting with a straight bar?

Although the standard deadlift with an Olympic barbell is the most common and the method used in deadlift competitions, many men find that deadlifting with a hex bar is less stressful on the back and more comfortable overall.

Is deadlifting with a trap bar easier?

Is deadlifting with a trap bar easier?

Trap bar deadlifts are slightly easier to do than standard deadlifts, making them suitable for novices. The bar route is straight, the grip is easier to achieve, and your lower back is less stressed. You don’t strike your shins with the bar – when executing barbell deadlifts, it’s simple to hit your shins with the bar.

F.A.Q is a hex bar deadlift easier:

How much simpler is it to deadlift using a hex bar?

The vertical displacement of the bar from starting position to lift completion is 22 percent shorter in a high-handle hex-bar deadlift (1) and 20 percent shorter in a sumo deadlift (1) when using the conventional deadlift as a reference point.

With a hex bar, can you deadlift more?

Because the hex bar places more power into the knees, the hex bar deadlift is similar to the squat exercise in that your legs do a lot of the effort. The barbell deadlift is a better choice if you want to focus more on your lower back muscles and less on your legs.

Is it worthwhile to invest in a hex bar?

There are two ways in which a hex bar’s distinctive design can help you. For starters, it makes squats and deadlifts lot safer and less taxing on your back. The burden is carried more steadily by your body when the weights are centred on your body rather than out in front or behind.

Conclusion:

Finally, the hex-bar deadlift involves slightly higher forces but a significantly faster bar speed, resulting in higher power outputs than the straight bar deadlift.

This could be due to a mix of factors, such as a wider knee range of motion and a more vertical bar path, making the hex bar more ideal for athletes that need high-velocity strength.

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Field John

If you are an avid believer in health and fitness and want to do something for your team, I can help. As the founder of Field Goals Fitness, I lead a collective of health and fitness professionals dedicated to helping Australians lead a more active and healthier lifestyle. With a warm, friendly, and supportive approach that gets results, I enjoy helping individuals & organisations achieve sustainable success with their health and fitness goals. Certifying as a Personal Trainer in 2009, was a turning point in my life. I had spent 14 years in the corporate world in Business Development roles and decided to take all that I had learnt in sales and marketing and start my own business.

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