Deadlift

Is hex bar deadlift better? Benefits of Hex Bar Deadlifts

The deadlift is the ultimate test of strength for the entire body. While the regular Olympic bar is still the most common way to perform deadlifts, more men are opting for the hex bar, which is a hexagon-shaped bar that you stand in the middle of. Because many bodybuilders use it to shrug, it’s commonly referred to as a “trap bar.”

Is hex bar deadlift better
Is hex bar deadlift better

Although the normal deadlift with an Olympic barbell is the most frequent and the method utilised in deadlift contests, many men feel that deadlifting with a hex bar is better and more comfortable overall.

What Is a Deadlift with a Hex Bar?

What Is a Deadlift with a Hex Bar?

The hex bar deadlift, also known as the trap bar deadlift, is a deadlift variation in which the lifter steps inside a hexagon-shaped barbell and lifts the weight around them. Hex bars have two sets of handles, one at standard height and the other somewhat higher for easy lifting; this makes hex bar deadlifts a suitable choice for novices.

Benefits of Hex Bar Deadlifts

The biomechanics of the hex bar deadlift and normal barbell deadlift were examined in a study published in September 2017 by the Strength and Conditioning Journal. The study discovered that using a hex bar increased 1-repetition max for the deadlift, thus you could theoretically create a new PR by raising your hex bar weight.

Benefits of Hex Bar Deadlifts

Hex bar deadlifts maintain the weight closer to the lifter’s centre of gravity and allow the lifter to stay more upright during the activity, potentially reducing the risk of low back injury.

In contrast to traditional barbell deadlifts, which use a pronated, supinated, or mixed (one side supinated, one side pronated) grip, hex bar deadlifts place the forearms in a neutral position. The wrist, elbow, and biceps may be less likely to be injured as a result of this.

Cons of Hex Bar Deadlifts

Cons of Hex Bar Deadlifts

For shorter trainees, they can be difficult. Because the handles are a fixed width, folks with shorter arms may find the grip excessively wide.

There is less emphasis on the posterior chain. The quadriceps get more attention than the glutes, hamstrings, and lower back. You’ll need to add more posterior-chain-focused modifications to your routine (like the standard barbell deadlift).

How to do The Hex Bar?

How to do The Hex Bar?
  1. Begin by placing the weight on the ground and loading it with as many bumper plates as you can safely lift.
  2. With your feet shoulder width apart, back straight, and knees slightly bent, stand inside the hex.
  3. Bend down and grab the Hex Bar by the handles—some have “high handles” for shrugging, while others have “low handles” built into the body of the bar.
  4. As you lift the weight, drive your hips forwards and keep your back flat. Maintain a strong spine throughout the action by keeping your head in a neutral position with your chin slightly elevated and your chest up.
  5. Control your movement when you lower the barbell back to the ground if you’re dealing with light weight. It’s fine to drop the barbell on the last rep if the barbell is fully loaded.

What’s the Difference Between a Hex Bar Deadlift and a Deadlift?

What’s the Difference Between a Hex Bar Deadlift and a Deadlift?

Many of the same muscle groups are worked by the hex bar deadlift as they are by the traditional deadlift. There are, however, a few distinctions between them. Hex bar deadlifts may feel easier for certain lifters because the weight is kept closer to your centre of gravity throughout the exercise. Hex bar deadlifts, when done correctly, place less stress on your lower back and biceps than traditional deadlifts.

When compared to the traditional deadlift, the hex bar deadlift delivers more knee flexion, which means your knees bend slightly more when completing the hex bar deadlift. The hex bar deadlift is comparable to a squat in that it demands a more upright torso due to the knee flexion.

Hex bar deadlifts work your quadriceps, whereas traditional barbell deadlifts focus on muscular groups in your lower back and backs of your legs (such as the hamstrings and erector spinae muscles).

How to Exercise Safely to Avoid Injuries

Consult your doctor before starting an exercise programme if you have a past or pre-existing health issue. Proper exercise technique is critical for ensuring the safety and success of an exercise programme, but depending on your specific demands, you may need to alter each exercise to achieve the best results.

How to Exercise Safely to Avoid Injuries

Always choose a weight that permits you to maintain complete body control throughout the exercise. Pay great attention to your body when doing any exercise, and stop immediately if you feel any pain or discomfort.

Incorporate correct warm-ups, rest, and nutrition into your training regimen to see continuous growth and build body strength. Your capacity to adequately recuperate from your workouts will ultimately determine your results. Allow for adequate recovery by resting for 24 to 48 hours before training the same muscle groups.

Examine the Bars

Examine the Bars

A barbell is a 7-foot-long metal bar that is straight. Weight plates are held in place by the sleeves at the ends of the bar to provide resistance. The hexagonal form of the hex bar gives it its name. You stand in the hexagon’s centre, holding the handles on both sides.

From the hexagon’s middle points, bars with sleeves to hold the weight plates extend. The weight is in front of your body with a barbell, while the hex bar’s design positions the weight in the centre of your body.

Is deadlifting with a hex bar easier?

Is deadlifting with a hex bar easier?

Hex bar deadlifts may feel easier for certain lifters because the weight is kept closer to your centre of gravity throughout the exercise. Hex bar deadlifts, when done correctly, place less stress on your lower back and biceps than traditional deadlifts.

Is deadlifting with a hex bar better than deadlifting with a bar?

Is deadlifting with a hex bar better than deadlifting with a bar?

Because the hex bar places more power into the knees, the hex bar deadlift is similar to the squat exercise in that your legs do a lot of the effort. The barbell deadlift is a better choice if you want to focus more on your lower back muscles and less on your legs.

F.A.Q is hex bar deadlift better:

Is Deadlifting with a hex bar safer?

The trap bar deadlift was not only a safer workout than the straight bar deadlift, but it was also more successful at producing maximal power.

How heavy is a hex bar?

A trap bar (or hex bar) can weigh anywhere from 44 to 66 pounds (20 to 30 kilogrammes), depending on the design, make, and model. Many elements go into determining the overall weight of a trap bar or hex bar, so be sure you know which one you’re using before calculating your total weight lifted.

Are hex bar deadlifts worth it?

Deadlifts using a trap bar strengthen the glutes, hamstrings, and back. The key advantage is that they place less stress on the lumbar spine than barbell deadlifts, which is beneficial for persons who have back problems. They are easier to learn and need less technical proficiency than barbell deadlifts.

Conclusion:

Deadlifts with a barbell and a hex bar both have advantages. Include both exercises in your strength-training routine to target various muscles and offer variation to your workout.

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Field John

If you are an avid believer in health and fitness and want to do something for your team, I can help. As the founder of Field Goals Fitness, I lead a collective of health and fitness professionals dedicated to helping Australians lead a more active and healthier lifestyle. With a warm, friendly, and supportive approach that gets results, I enjoy helping individuals & organisations achieve sustainable success with their health and fitness goals. Certifying as a Personal Trainer in 2009, was a turning point in my life. I had spent 14 years in the corporate world in Business Development roles and decided to take all that I had learnt in sales and marketing and start my own business.

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