Exercises

Trap Workouts: The 22 Best Trap Exercises for Strength and Size . No Weights Required for Traps Exercises

It’s no secret that a strong upper back and traps are important for athletes and gym-goers alike.

Upper traps exercises

Not only do they look impressive, but a strong upper back can also help improve performance and prevent injuries. In this blog post, we’ll discuss three exercises that you can use to target your upper traps.

We’ll also provide instructions on how to perform each exercise safely and effectively. So, if you’re looking to add some size and strength to your upper traps exercise, read on!

The Traps’ Anatomy

The Traps’ Anatomy

The traps are a group of three muscles: the trapezius (upper, middle, and lower), rhomboids (major and minor), and levator scapulae.

These muscles are responsible for moving the shoulders and neck.

Higher Traps

The upper traps attach to the base of the skull and the lower part of the neck.

Its main function is to elevate (shrug) the shoulders.

To work this muscle, you can do shrugs, elevations, and rows.

Middle Traps

The middle traps attach to the outer edge of the shoulder blade.

Its main function is to stabilize the scapula (shoulder blade).

To work this muscle, you can do shrugs, rows, and pull-ups.

Lower Traps

The lower traps attach to the inner edge of the shoulder blade.

Its main function is to depress (pull down) the scapula.

To work this muscle, you can do shrugs, elevations, and rows.

The Advantages of Trap Training

The Advantages of Trap Training

Trap training has many advantages:

Better Posture

The traps are responsible for holding the shoulders in their sockets. When the traps are weak, the shoulders will slump forward. This can lead to poor posture and back pain.

Increased Pulling Power

The traps are responsible for lifting the weight of the arms. This is why strong traps are essential for activities such as pull-ups, chin-ups, and rows.

How to Get Your Traps Ready for Training

How to Get Your Traps Ready for Training

Before you start training your traps, it is important to warm up. This will help prevent injury and increase blood flow to the muscles.

Here are some exercises that you can do to warm up the traps:

Shoulder Circles

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms by your sides. Slowly circle your shoulders forwards 10 times, then backwards 10 times.

Neck Swivels

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms by your sides. Slowly turn your head to the right, then to the left. Repeat 10 times in each direction.

Arm Swings

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms by your sides. Swing your arms forwards and backwards 10 times.

Putting Everything Together

Putting Everything Together

Now that you know the traps’ anatomy and the benefits of trap training, it’s time to put everything together and start working out!

Here are some exercises that will help you build strong, toned traps:

1. Dumbbell Shrugs

2. Barbell rows

3. Pull-ups

4. Face pulls

5. Deadlifts

Exercises for traps that work:

Shrug the Trap Bar

Shrug the Trap Bar

The shrug is a basic movement that targets the upper traps, which are the large muscles at the top of your shoulders.

The trap bar is a type of weightlifting equipment that allows you to perform this exercise with greater stability and range of motion than using a traditional barbell.

The Trap Bar Shrug’s Advantages

There are several advantages to using the trap bar for shrugs as opposed to a traditional barbell.

For one, the trap bar allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Additionally, the trap bar provides greater stability and balance than a traditional barbell, which can be helpful if you’re new to this exercise or lifting weights in general.

Finally, the trap bar offers a greater range of motion than a traditional barbell, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

How to Shrug the Trap Bar

1. Start by standing in the middle of the trap bar with your feet shoulder-width apart.

2. Bend your knees and hips to lower your body down into a squatting position.

3. Grip the handles of the trap bar with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

4. Keeping your back straight, raise your hips so that you’re standing tall. This is your starting position.

5. From here, raise your shoulders as high as you can before lowering them back down to the starting position.

6. Repeat for 8-12 reps.”

Shrug with Cables

Shrug with Cables

The shrug is a basic movement that targets the upper traps, which are the large muscles at the top of your shoulders.

Cables offer a number of benefits over using dumbbells or a barbell for this exercise.

The Cable Shrug’s Advantages

First, cables offer more stability than dumbbells, which can be helpful if you’re new to this exercise or lifting weights in general.

Second, cables allow you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Finally, cables offer a greater range of motion than dumbbells, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

How to Shrug the Cable

1. Start by standing in the middle of a cable machine with your feet shoulder-width apart.

2. Grip the handles of the cables with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise your hips so that you’re standing tall. This is your starting position.

4. From here, raise your shoulders as high as you can before lowering them back down to the starting position.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Shrug with Dumbbells

Shrug with Dumbbells

The shrug is a basic movement that targets the upper traps, which are the large muscles at the top of your shoulders.

The Dumbbell Shrug’s Advantages

First, dumbbells allow you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, dumbbells offer a greater range of motion than cables, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, dumbbells are more versatile than cables, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Shrug the Dumbbell

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Bend your knees and hips to lower your body down into a squatting position.

3. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

4. Keeping your back straight, raise your hips so that you’re standing tall. This is your starting position.

5. From here, raise your shoulders as high as you can before lowering them back down to the starting position.

6. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Kirk Shrug

Kirk Shrug

The Kirk Shrug is a variation of the traditional shrug that targets the upper traps.

The Kirk Shrug’s Advantages

First, the Kirk Shrug allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Kirk Shrug offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, the Kirk Shrug is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Kirk Shrug

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Bend your knees and hips to lower your body down into a squatting position.

3. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

4. Keeping your back straight, raise your hips so that you’re standing tall. This is your starting position.

5. From here, raise your shoulders as high as you can before lowering them back down to the starting position.

6. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Overhead Barbell Carry

Overhead Barbell Carry

The Overhead Barbell Carry is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

The Overhead Barbell Carry’s Advantages

First, the Overhead Barbell Carry allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Overhead Barbell Carry offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, the Overhead Barbell Carry is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Overhead Barbell Carry

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a barbell in front of you.

2. Grip the barbell with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the barbell overhead until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, raise your shoulders as high as you can before lowering them back down to the starting position.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Carry for Farmers Walk

Carry for Farmers Walk

The Farmer’s Walk is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

The Farmer’s Walk’s Advantages

First, the Farmer’s Walk allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Farmer’s Walk offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, the Farmer’s Walk is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Farmer’s Walk

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Keeping your back straight, raise your hips so that you’re standing tall. This is your starting position.

3. From here, walk forward while keeping your shoulders down and your back straight.

4. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Rowing Dumbbells

Rowing Dumbbells

Rowing with dumbbells is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

Rowing Dumbbell’s Advantages

First, rowing with dumbbells allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, rowing with dumbbells offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, rowing with dumbbells is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Rowing Dumbbells

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Bend your knees and hips to lower your body down into a squatting position.

3. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

4. Keeping your back straight, raise your hips so that you’re standing tall. This is your starting position.

5. From here, row the dumbbells up to your sides, leading with your elbows.

6. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Deadlift with Trap Bar

Deadlift with Trap Bar

The Deadlift with Trap Bar is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

The Deadlift with Trap Bar’s Advantages

First, the Deadlift with Trap Bar allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Deadlift with Trap Bar offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, the Deadlift with Trap Bar is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Deadlift with Trap Bar

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a trap bar in front of you.

2. Grip the trap bar with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the trap bar up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, lower the trap bar down to your knees before standing back up to the starting position.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Pull the rack down

Pull the rack down

Pull the rack down is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

Pull the rack down’s Advantages

First, pull the rack down allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, pull the rack down offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, pull the rack down is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Pull the rack down

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a barbell in front of you.

2. Grip the barbell with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the barbell up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, lower the barbell down to your thighs before standing back up to the starting position.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells

Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells

The Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells’ Advantages

First, the Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, the Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Prone Y-Raise with Dumbbells

1. Start by lying face down on a bench with a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Bend your knees and hips to lower your body down onto the bench.

3. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

4. Keeping your back straight, raise your chest up off the bench. This is your starting position.

5. From here, row the dumbbells up to your sides, leading with your elbows.

6. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Upright Row with EZ-Bar

Upright Row with EZ-Bar

The Upright Row with EZ-Bar is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

Upright Row with EZ-Bar’s Advantages

First, the Upright Row with EZ-Bar allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Upright Row with EZ-Bar offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, the Upright Row with EZ-Bar is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Upright Row with EZ-Bar

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and an EZ-bar in front of you.

2. Grip the bar with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the bar up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, row the bar up to your chin, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Pull-Apart Rope

Pull-Apart Rope

The Pull-Apart Rope with Resistance Band is an exercise that targets the upper traps.

Pull-Apart Rope with Resistance Band’s Advantages

First, the Pull-Apart Rope with Resistance Band allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Pull-Apart Rope with Resistance Band offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your upper traps.

Finally, the Pull-Apart Rope with Resistance Band is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Pull-Apart Rope with Resistance Band

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a resistance band in front of you.

2. Grip the handles of the band with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the band up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, row the band up to your chin, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Lateral Raise using Dumbbells

Lateral Raise using Dumbbells

The Lateral Raise using Dumbbells is an exercise that targets the deltoids.

Lateral Raise using Dumbbells’ Advantages

First, the Lateral Raise using Dumbbells allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, the Lateral Raise using Dumbbells offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your deltoids.

Finally, the Lateral Raise using Dumbbells is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform the Lateral Raise using Dumbbells

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise your arms out to your sides until they are parallel to the ground. This is your starting position.

4. From here, raise your arms up until they are above your head.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Pulling the face

Pulling the face

The Pulling the Face is an exercise that targets the muscles of the face.

Pulling the Face’s Advantages

First, Pulling the Face allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Pulling the Face offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target the muscles of your face.

Finally, Pulling the Face is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Pulling the Face

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and your hands at your sides.

2. Grip the handles of the band with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3.Keeping your back straight, raise the band up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, row the band up to your chin, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Military Dumbbell Press

Military Dumbbell Press

The Military Dumbbell Press is an exercise that targets the shoulder muscles.

Military Dumbbell Press’ Advantages

First, Military Dumbbell Press allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Military Dumbbell Press offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your shoulder muscles.

Finally, Military Dumbbell Press is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Military Dumbbell Press

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the dumbbells up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, press the dumbbells up overhead until your arms are fully extended.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Snatching Dumbbells

Snatching Dumbbells

The Snatching Dumbbells is an exercise that targets the muscles of the back.

Snatching Dumbbells’ Advantages

First, Snatching Dumbbells allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Snatching Dumbbells offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your back muscles.

Finally, Snatching Dumbbells is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Snatching Dumbbells

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the dumbbells up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, quickly pull the dumbbells up to your chin, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Shrug Pullup

Shrug Pullup

The Shrug Pullup is an exercise that targets the muscles of the back.

Shrug Pullup’s Advantages

First, Shrug Pullup allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Shrug Pullup offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your back muscles.

Finally, Shrug Pullup is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Shrug Pullup

1. Start by standing underneath a pullup bar with your feet shoulder-width apart and your hands at your sides.

2. Grip the bar with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise yourself up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, quickly pull yourself up to the bar, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Dumbbell Shrug with Incline

Dumbbell Shrug with Incline

The Dumbbell Shrug with Incline is an exercise that targets the muscles of the back.

Dumbbell Shrug with Incline’s Advantages

First, Dumbbell Shrug with Incline allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Dumbbell Shrug with Incline offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your back muscles.

Finally, Dumbbell Shrug with Incline is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Dumbbell Shrug with Incline

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Grip the handles of the dumbbells with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Place your feet on an incline bench or other elevated surface.

4. Keeping your back straight, raise the dumbbells up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

5. From here, quickly shrug your shoulders up to your ears, leading with your elbows.

6. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back

Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back

The Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back is an exercise that targets the muscles of the back.

Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back’s Advantages

First, Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your back muscles.

Finally, Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Barbell Shrug Behind-the-Back

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a barbell behind your back.

2. Grip the barbell with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the barbell up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, quickly shrug your shoulders up to your ears, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Shrug using overhead barbells

Shrug using overhead barbells

The Shrug using overhead barbells is an exercise that targets the muscles of the back.

Shrug using overhead barbells’ Advantages

First, Shrug using overhead barbells allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Shrug using overhead barbells offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your back muscles.

Finally, Shrug using overhead barbells is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Shrug using overhead barbells

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a barbell overhead.

2. Grip the barbell with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the barbell up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, quickly shrug your shoulders up to your ears, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell

High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell

The High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell is an exercise that targets the muscles of the back.

High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell’s Advantages

First, High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your back muscles.

Finally, High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform High Pull using Snatch-Grip Barbell

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a barbell in front of you.

2. Grip the barbell with your hands, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the barbell up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, quickly shrug your shoulders up to your ears, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Overhead Dumbbell Carry

Overhead Dumbbell Carry

The Overhead Dumbbell Carry is an exercise that targets the muscles of the back.

Overhead Dumbbell Carry’s Advantages

First, Overhead Dumbbell Carry allows you to keep your hands in a more natural position at your sides rather than out in front of you. This can help reduce stress on your shoulders and lower your risk of injury.

Second, Overhead Dumbbell Carry offers a greater range of motion than the traditional shrug, allowing you to better target your back muscles.

Finally, Overhead Dumbbell Carry is more versatile than the traditional shrug, allowing you to perform this exercise with one hand or two hands as desired.

How to Perform Overhead Dumbbell Carry

1. Start by standing with your feet shoulder-width apart and a dumbbell in each hand.

2. Press the dumbbells overhead, keeping your palms facing inward.

3. Keeping your back straight, raise the dumbbells up until your arms are fully extended. This is your starting position.

4. From here, quickly shrug your shoulders up to your ears, leading with your elbows.

5. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

No Weights Required for Traps Exercises

No Weights Required for Traps Exercises

One of the best things about traps exercises is that you don’t need any weights to do them. This makes them perfect for home workouts or for when you’re traveling and can’t access a gym.

Here are two traps exercises you can do without any weights:

1. Shrugs: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and raise your shoulders up to your ears, then release. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

2. High Pulls: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and pull your hands up to your chest, keeping your palms facing inward. Repeat for 8-12 reps.

Remember to focus on quality over quantity when doing these exercises. A few sets of well-executed reps will do more for your traps than hours of mindlessly doing them.

Is it possible for my trapezius to be injured?

Is it possible for my trapezius to be injured?

Yes, it is possible for your trapezius to be injured. The trapezius is a muscle that runs from the back of the neck to the middle of the back and is responsible for moving the shoulders.

This muscle can be injured due to overexertion, repetitive motions, or direct trauma. Symptoms of an injured trapezius include pain, tenderness, swelling, and difficulty moving the affected arm.

If you think you may have injured your trapezius, it is important to see a doctor or other medical professional for diagnosis and treatment.

F.A.Q upper traps exercises:

How do you build upper traps?

The upper traps may be built through shrugs and upright rows, while the mid traps can be grown by drawing the shoulder blades together.

Do big traps look good?

Big traps—specifically, the top traps—look fantastic from an aesthetic sense. Big traps, on the other hand, aren’t all that crucial in terms of performance.

Do push ups work trapezius?

Other muscles you’ll be working during a push-up, according to the National Academy of Sports Medicine, include the pectoralis major (chest muscle), anterior deltoids (shoulders), triceps, biceps, rhomboids (upper-back muscles that link your spine and shoulder blades), and trapezius.

Are traps easy to grow?

The Trapezius muscle is mostly used for endurance (if you think about it, it has to hold up the weight of your arms all day long and thus would respond better to a higher rep workout). To put it another way, it takes a lot of repetitions to get it to develop.

Conclusion:

Upper traps exercises are important to help with posture and preventing neck pain. If you have been experiencing neck pain, it is important to see a doctor to determine the cause.

In the meantime, try doing some of these upper traps exercises to help relieve some of the tension.

Field John

If you are an avid believer in health and fitness and want to do something for your team, I can help. As the founder of Field Goals Fitness, I lead a collective of health and fitness professionals dedicated to helping Australians lead a more active and healthier lifestyle. With a warm, friendly, and supportive approach that gets results, I enjoy helping individuals & organisations achieve sustainable success with their health and fitness goals. Certifying as a Personal Trainer in 2009, was a turning point in my life. I had spent 14 years in the corporate world in Business Development roles and decided to take all that I had learnt in sales and marketing and start my own business.

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