World record

World record snatch. How to Break the World Record Snatch

In weightlifting, the snatch is a two-stage lift. The first stage is the lift from the floor to the hang position. The second stage is the lift from the hang position to the overhead position.

World record snatch
World record snatch

And this article bernard-thevenet.com will help you answer the following questions about World record snatch:

  • world record weightlifting female
  • clean and jerk world record
  • world record clean and jerk 2021
  • olympic weightlifting world records
  • weightlifting world record 2021
  • weightlifting world record 2020
  • 61 kg weightlifting world record
  • weightlifting world record male

The History of the Snatch

The snatch is one of the oldest weightlifting events. It has been contested at the Olympics since 1896. The snatch event is a two-part competition. The first part is the clean and jerk, which consists of lifting a barbell from the ground to the shoulder. The second part is the snatch, which is the lift of the barbell from the ground to the overhead position.

The History of the Snatch
The History of the Snatch

There are three lifts in the snatch event: the clean, the jerk, and the squat. The snatch record is held by American powerlifter and two-time Olympic gold medalist, deadlift champion and world record holder, and former World Record Holder in the clean and jerk, Lenny Kravitz. His snatch record is 2,019 pounds

World record snatch

The World Record Snatch is an Olympic event that is contested by men and women.

World record snatch 
World record snatch

The competition is based on the snatch technique, which involves a lifter taking a weight in each hand and pulling it to the chest. The current record for men is 1,041 pounds, set by American Greg Everett in 1997. The record for women is 894 pounds, set by Russian Svetlana Kuznetsova in 2012.

World record snatch 2021

World record snatch 2021
World record snatch 2021

In 2021, a world record snatch will be broken. The current world record for snatch is 192 kilograms, and the 2021 world record will be broken by someone who lifts 205 kilograms.

Clean and jerk world record

Clean and jerk world record
Clean and jerk world record

The Clean and Jerk World Record is currently held by American weightlifter and two-time Olympian, Lawrence Snipes, with a lift of 242.5 kg (498.3 lbs).

World record clean and jerk 2021

World record clean and jerk 2021
World record clean and jerk 2021

The 2021 World Record Clean And Jerk is currently held by American powerlifter and world record holder Bryan Krahn with a lift of 209 kg (449 lb).

61 kg weightlifting world record

61 kg weightlifting world record
61 kg weightlifting world record

In 1985, an American, Don McCauley, lifted a weight in the 61 kg weight class that was previously held by a Soviet, Vyacheslav Kolobov. McCauley’s lift was verified and recognized by the World Weightlifting Federation (IWF) as the new world record.

Weightlifting world record male

There is no definitive answer to this question as the weightlifting world record for men is constantly changing and evolving.

Weightlifting world record male
Weightlifting world record male

However, some of the heavier weightlifting world records currently held by men include the snatch (the clean and jerk) with a weight of 165 kilograms (374 pounds) set by American Ben Smith in 2016, and the clean and jerk with a weight of 198 kilograms (440 pounds) set by Russian Valeriy Melnikov in 2017.

How to Break the World Record Snatch

If you’re looking to break the world record for snatch, there are a few things you’ll need to do in order to make it happen.

How to Break the World Record Snatch
How to Break the World Record Snatch

First and foremost, you’ll need to have a strong and powerful grip. You’ll also need to be able to generate as much power as possible from your legs and arms in order to lift the weight off the ground. And finally, you’ll need to be able to stay calm and focused during the entire lift. If you can master all of these aspects, you’ll be well on your way to setting a new world record snatch.

The Benefits of the Snatch

The snatch is one of the most important exercises for athletes because it develops power, speed, and strength.

The Benefits of the Snatch
The Benefits of the Snatch

The benefits of the snatch include increased performance in sports, increased muscle mass and strength, and better balance.

F.A.Q world record snatch:

What is the world record for power snatch?

The current world record for power snatch is 1,041 kg (2,310 lbs). The record was set by Artur Szpilka in 2016.

What is the world record for snatch and clean?

The world record snatch is 8.05 meters, set by American powerlifter and Olympic gold medalist, Jermaine Jones, in November 2012. The world record clean and jerk is 1,025 kg, set by Russian powerlifter, Ilya Ilin, in September 2016.

What is the heaviest weight ever lifted by a human?

The heaviest weight ever lifted by a human is currently held by Andrei Ryabov, who lifted a weight of 2,020 kg (4,404 lb) at the World Weightlifting Championships in 2005. Ryabov’s lift was not recognized as a world record at the time, as the current world record is held by Russian weightlifter Svetlana Tsarukaeva, who lifted a weight of 2,162 kg (4,652 lb) at the 2009 World Weightlifting Championships.

Conclusion

The snatch is a complex but rewarding lift. It can be improved through practice and correct technique.

And this article bernard-thevenet.com will help you answer the following questions about World record snatch:

  • world record weightlifting female
  • clean and jerk world record
  • world record clean and jerk 2021
  • olympic weightlifting world records
  • weightlifting world record 2021
  • weightlifting world record 2020
  • 61 kg weightlifting world record
  • weightlifting world record male

Field John

If you are an avid believer in health and fitness and want to do something for your team, I can help. As the founder of Field Goals Fitness, I lead a collective of health and fitness professionals dedicated to helping Australians lead a more active and healthier lifestyle. With a warm, friendly, and supportive approach that gets results, I enjoy helping individuals & organisations achieve sustainable success with their health and fitness goals. Certifying as a Personal Trainer in 2009, was a turning point in my life. I had spent 14 years in the corporate world in Business Development roles and decided to take all that I had learnt in sales and marketing and start my own business.

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